From ABC to ABSeas

Sustainable consumption and production

11 ways to green your laundry

Though it may seem like a pedestrian chore, doing the laundry has a bigger impact on the planet than you might think. Between 75 and 80 percent of our clothing’s lifecycle impact comes from washing and drying, according to reports by Proctor (pdf) and Marks & Spencer, because it takes so much energy to heat the wash water and run the dry cycle. So there’s huge potential to reduce your personal energy and water use, and therefore your environmental footprint, by simply greening your laundry habits.

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Accelerator-lite

How to be a more effective agent of change. In the video you see the Sustainability Compass and Pyramid in action. The website gives you access to the resources to carry out the same exercises.

 

http://atkisson.com/acceleratorlite/
Active learning methodology

The Images and Objects Toolkit is for facilitators and teachers interested in education for sustainable development. The booklet includes step-by-step instructions for planning and implementing Education for Sustainable Development activities by using images and objects, together with a starter kit of sample images.

This is a key publication for the Prof E Sus project.

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Agroecology

Agroecology: The ecology of sustainable food systems

by Stephen Gliessmann

Agroecology is a science, a productive practice, and part of a social movement that is at the forefront of transforming food systems to sustainability. Building upon the ecological foundation of the agroecosystem, Agroecology: The Ecology of Sustainable Food Systems, Third Edition provides the essential foundation for understanding sustainability in all of its components: agricultural, ecological, economic, social, cultural, and even political. It presents a case for food system change and why the current industrial model of food production and distribution is not sustainable.

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Close the loop: SDG 12

Online course offered by the United Nations System Staff College

Close the Loop: SDG 12 online course

An online course that provides participants with hands-on understanding of sustainable consumption and production, and its role as a stand-alone Sustainable Development Goal in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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Eco laundry habits

Eco laundry habits are about more than sustainable washing machines
From CEOs only washing their jeans annually to communal drying areas becoming commonplace, sustainable laundry behaviour goes beyond switching to 30C.

by Luke Yates and David Evans, Thursday 9 October 2014

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Eco-laundry

A Leonardo EU project
6 training modules providing basic knowledge about sustainable processing in industrial laundries.

The use of this site and the training modules is free of charge. It is addressed to laundry managers, quality and technical managers of laundries. The tool can also be applied for initial and further training of laundries employees and apprentices. The learning contents are also integrated in the curriculum of the universities of the project partnership.

http://www.laundry-sustainability.eu/
Food, globalization and sustainability

Food, globalization and sustainability

by Peter Ossterveer and David A Sonnenfeld

Published 2012 by Routledge

Food is increasingly traded internationally, thereby transforming the organization of food production and consumption globally and influencing most food-related practices. This transition is generating unfamiliar challenges related to sustainability of food provision, the social impacts of international trade and global food governance. Distance in time and space between food producers and consumers is increasing and new concerns are arising. These include the environmental impact of food production and trade, animal welfare, the health and safety of food and the social and economic impact of international food trade.

This book provides an overview of the principal conceptual frameworks that have been developed for understanding these changes. It shows how conventional regulation of food provision through sovereign national governments is becoming elusive, as the distinctions between domestic and international, and between public and private spheres, disappear. At the same time multi-national companies and supranational institutions put serious limits to governmental interventions. In this context, other social actors including food retailers and NGOs are shown to take up innovative roles in governing food provision, but their contribution to agro-food sustainability is under continuous scrutiny. The authors apply these themes in several detailed case studies, including organic, fair trade, local food and fish. On the basis of these cases, future developments are explored, with a focus on the respective roles of agricultural producers, retailers and consumers.

Food, place and authenticity

Food, place and authenticity: local food and the sustainable tourism experience
Rebecca Sims
Pages 321-336 | Received 10 Mar 2008, Accepted 25 Jun 2008, Published online: 01 May 2009

Abstract
In recent years, attempts to improve the economic and environmental sustainability of both tourism and agriculture have been linked to the development of “alternative” food networks and a renewed enthusiasm for food products that are perceived to be traditional and local. This paper draws on research from two UK regions, the Lake District and Exmoor, to argue that local food can play an important role in the sustainable tourism experience because it appeals to the visitor’s desire for authenticity within the holiday experience. Using evidence from qualitative interviews with tourists and food producers, the paper records ways in which local foods are conceptualised as “authentic” products that symbolise the place and culture of the destination. By engaging with debates surrounding the meaning of locality and authenticity, the paper challenges existing understandings of these concepts and offers a new way forward for tourism research by arguing that “local food” has the potential to enhance the visitor experience by connecting consumers to the region and its perceived culture and heritage.

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From ABC to ABSeas

This first Ocean Literacy MOOC aims to sensitise and enable teachers and students to incorporate ocean literacy into educational programmes.

Education in its broader understanding (in both formal and informal settings) serves as a high potential channel to reach young citizens. As a lack of sufficient ‘Ocean Literacy’ has been identified in many countries, this clearly presents a barrier for citizens to engage in ocean responsible behaviour or consider ocean-related careers.

To overcome this, it is recommended to develop education to provide the capacity to understand environmental issues, to participate in decision-making processes and to bring about changes in behaviour.

Ocean Literacy can be seen as a way of incorporating scientific literacy in practice in education, whereby scientific literacy not only refers to a person’s knowledge of science but also to his or her ability to use this knowledge in making socially responsible decisions.

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